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Max goes to the Movies

Jaws is the 1975 thriller, directed by Steven Spielberg, that gripped viewers in utter suspense and had them leaving theaters wondering if they could ever go in the water again.

It’s this move that sparked the whole “Max goes to the Movies” project anyway, so it seemed fitting that it should start us off. Both my parents vividly remember seeing this movie, and were quick to share stories of their experience.

And now I have some of my own. Because this movie, even after 39 years, was able to give me jumps and scares that I’ll remember for a while. It’s the first movie in a long time that I have jumped OUT of me seat from. And the suspense that starts with those opening two notes carries and builds throughout the whole movie, and it left me pushing my chair back as far as it could go and yelling obscenities at the screen during the finale.

Not only does Jaws work you into a fervor in its 2 hours, it doesn’t hold back any punches. I haven’t seen a thriller/horror/action movie where someone under the age of 15 dies in a while. It shocked me when that happened, and worked in pulling me even deeper into the movie. The talk that one character, a vetran of WWII, gives grounded and expanded the movie. And incredibly, it was a line he delivered in his speech that stuck with me, instead of the age old and classic “You’re gonna need a bigger boat.”

"Anyway, we delivered the bomb" was what got me, referring to the USS Indianapolis and her mission to help deliver Little Boy. It was interesting to have that reference, and then sit there thinking about what that meant to the first people viewing that movie, back in ‘75. WWII had only been 30 years ago, enough for a new generation to be born, but for it to still be very fresh for most people. It felt like a nod towards the idea that Humans fight and squabble and tear each other apart, yet there’s always something else waiting to get us.

Another piece I loved was the slow showing of the Shark. You never get a true understanding for it’s size until the last half of the movie. And then it’s gone, then it’s back, then it’s gone. It isn’t until the final scenes that you truly see the thing in all it’s glory, and that keeps you tied down and wanting more. It’s an incredibly simple technique that isn’t used as much in movies. Like poker, you should never reveal your whole hand until the last possible moment. 

Would I watch Jaws again? You bet. I wanted to throw it back on half an hour after watching. Am I going to watch the sequels? Maybe on a rainy day when I’m really missing the beach.

unacted:

girls who pretend to act stupid because they think it’s cute need to be slapped in the face with a brick

NO! Girls who pretend to be stupid because they think it’s cute need to be told their brain and passion and creativity are not things that degrade them! They need to be told that it’s okay to wear makeup AND explore ponds, it’s okay to want the latest in fashion AND the latest in Quantum physics. It’s okay to get excited about the Teen Choice Awards AND The Nobel Prizes. And then these girls need to be hugged.

It’s the society that tells these girls being smart will get them NOWHERE that needs to be hit with a brick!

Many personality characteristics of creative people … make them more vulnerable, including openness to new experiences, a tolerance for ambiguity, and an approach to life and the world that is relatively free of preconceptions. This flexibility permits them to perceive things in a fresh and novel way, which is an important basis for creativity. But it also means that their inner world is complex, ambiguous, and filled with shades of gray rather than black and white. It is a world filled with many questions and few easy answers. While less creative people can quickly respond to situations based on what they have been told by people in authority — parents, teachers, pastors, rabbis, or priests — the creative person lives in a more fluid and nebulous world. He or she may have to confront criticism or rejection for being too questioning, or too unconventional. Such traits can lead to feelings of depression or social alienation. A highly original person may seem odd or strange to others. Too much openness means living on the edge. Sometimes the person may drop over the edge… into depression, mania, or perhaps schizophrenia.
The Relationship Between Creativity and Mental Illness | Brain Pickings (via wildcat2030)

mishasminions:

ink-n-severedties:

toteardown:

cratenculture:

One of the TRUEST things I’ve ever came across.

Always reblog.

Wow

THIS IS THE GREATEST SPEECH EVER WRITTEN

What amazes me is that this speech was written for the X generation.

And yet is still resonates with my generation, the Y generation.

And the older members of the Z generation are beginning to see words like this and relate to them.

That’s three generations that are taking this speech as theirs. What does that say about our world?

(Source: god-body)

So this morning I suddenly had a bout of courage and snapped a selfie.
I hate taking selfies.
I usually hate how I look.

But going on 9 hours since I took the thing, I still like it.
Take selfies guys. Even if you’re feeling REMOTELY okay about yourself, give yourself the privilege to capture that moment.
Because right now, I am okay. And that’s pretty damn good compared to where I’ve been.

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